Suspect accused in deadly escape is formally charged

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa -- Wesley Correa-Carmenaty has been formally charged with murder and a long list of additional charges linked to his escape from custody on May 1 and the shooting of two deputies, one of whom died.

Arraignment has been scheduled for June 19 with an initial trial date set for July 25.

Deputy Mark Burbridge was shot to death in the incident.

The trial information charges:

  • Count I: Murder in the First Degree of Deputy Mark Burbridge, a Class A Felony (life in prison)
  • Count II: Kidnapping in the Second Degree against Amy Kanger, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • Count III: Attempt to Commit Murder against Deputy Pat Morgan, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • Count IV: Attempt to Commit Murder against Jerry Brittain, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • Count V: Robbery in the First Degree against Deputy Mark Burbridge and Deputy PatMorgan, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • Count VI: Robbery in the First Degree against Jerry Brittain, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • Count VII: Robbery in the First Degree against Amy Kanger, a Class B Felony (25 years)
  • County VIII: Intimidation with a Dangerous Weapon against Jerry Brittain and Kelsey Bridges, a Class C Felony (10 years)
  • Count IX: Felon in Possession of a Firearm, a Class D Felony (5 years)
  • Count X: Felon in Possession of a Firearm, a Class D Felony (5 years)
  • Count XI: Escape, a Class D Felony (5 years)
  • Count XII: Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, a Class C Felony (10 years)

In a news conference late Friday morning, Pottawattamie County Attorney Matt Wilber said, "I think I've charged probably just about everything other than running a red light, probably, in this case and I think that's appropriate."

With all of the attention this case has received in the metro, the prosecutor said there is a chance the defense could push for a change of trial venue. He said he plans to do what he can to keep it in Pottawattamie County, "but the law's the law."

Wilber said, "Im going to fight to keep it here but I'm also realistic, um, you know, I'll try it wherever I have to. I just think that we ought to give our citizens a fair chance to prove that they can be impartial jurors in this case."

He said wherever the case is tried, he's most interested in a fair trial for both sides because, "No matter what happens, I want to make sure the verdict sticks."

Read the original version of this article at www.wowt.com.



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