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Observing Flag Day with celebration and contest

DAR, Buffalo Bill State Historical Park, Nebraska Game and Parks, and KNOP-TV
Updated: Jun. 8, 2021 at 9:09 PM CDT
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NORTH PLATTE, Neb. (KNOP) - The Daughters of the American Revolution Sioux Lookout Chapter (DAR), Buffalo State Historical Park, Nebraska Game and Parks, and KNOP-TV are teaming up to observe Flag Day on Monday, June 14.

June 14 is Flag Day, and it is set aside, not as a legal holiday, but a special day to commemorate the adoption of the stars and stripes as the official flag of the United States on June 14, 1777. The holiday is beginning early in North Platte as local DAR members Molly O’Holleran and Michelle Lupomick spent Tuesday traveling around the city, thanking local businesses and locations for properly displaying their flags. Flag Day certificates were awarded for those “faithfully displaying the United States Flag,” according to DAR Regent Molly O’Holleran.

Flag Day Ceremony at Buffalo Bill State Historical Park

A special event is being planned for Monday, June 14, out at the Buffalo Bill State Historical Park at 10:00 a.m., with food and beverages and fun and marching and speeches, and flags.

The Flag Day Ceremony is including the Patriot Riders and the Boy Scouts who are presenting the flags. Kelly Hoatson is speaking from the Boy Scouts District Council. Another featured speaker Monday is Lieutenant Colonel Ed Lupomick. 100-year old DAR member Ibbie Majors is getting awarded a certificate.

Social Media Contest - Picture with a flag!

And a contest is starting now. DAR is challenging everyone to take a picture in front of a flag and post the picture on the KNOP-TV Facebook page. There is a special post at the top of the KNOP-TV Facebook page now where pictures may be posted. The picture with the most “likes” by 8:00 a.m. on Monday, June 14, will win a $50 check from DAR as a prize.

https://www.facebook.com/knoptv/photos/a.685164351495398/4342789712399492/

As for properly displaying flags, due to the nature of the flag and what it symbolizes, there is a United States Flag Code.

  • All American flags should be displayed from sunrise to sunset every day.
  • Lowering the flag at night is an ultimate sign of respect for Old Glory.
  • You can keep your flag flying 24 hours a day if it is properly illuminated during all hours of darkness.

Paige Beauvais of North Platte is of Native American heritage. She says as a Native American she believes she respects the flag and being an American, and being American means more to her than people think. She says Flag Day is a very important day, “especially if the flag isn’t hung upside down. That’s very disrespectful.”

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